About Me


Gavin Hubble - (BSc & Post Grad. Business Marketing) - I started working in the wine industry over 23 years ago in New Zealand. Working in; wine retail, sales, wine production, label & packaging design, marketing, wine buying, consulting and wine education. I am responsible for the Brand Health of 60+ wine brands distributed here in New Zealand. Wine Brands from New Zealand, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Chile and Argentina. I work closely with the Trade Industry - (Retail Stores & Restaurants) introducing, educating and positioning exciting and unique brands to wine enthusiasts all over the world.

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

Languedoc

Languedoc has a very long history and colourful history with grapes and wine. The Greeks planted there probably the first vine in France. It was 500 years B.C. A long time before the Romans, although they dramatically improved the wine making process themselves.
The regional area of Roussillon, Languedoc and Provence is one very large wine area, stretching all the way from the Spanish border, along the Mediterranean almost to the Italian border. It is one of the biggest wine growing regions in the world, and consists of more than a third of France's vineyard area, producing outstanding wines in a perfect grape growing climate and terrain that extends from the sea to the mountains.

 

There are 15 main wine regions (each region made up of many smaller domains) in Languedoc Roussillon, South France. The soils and 'terroirs' in this huge area are very varied, ranging from; Schist, Sandstone, Marl, Gravel, Pebbles, Limestone, to Granit and Alluvial soil; thus diversity resulting in the making of many marvelous and different styles of wine.
Also in this massive area are many different grape varieties, the reds include; Carignon (some of the oldest vines in France are Carignan grapes), Cinsault, Grenache Noir, Syrah, Mourvedre, Cabernet Franc, and Merlot.
The whites include; Chardonnay, Grenache Blanc, Picpoul, Marsanne, Roussanne, Vermantino, Mauzac, Chenin, Rolle and Clairette.
In the past this area was infamous for its' poorer quality viticulture with over high production yielding copious quantities of vin-de-table wines. This is no longer the case, yields have been significantly reduced and quality is now the name of the game.
Whether it be a personal preference, an experiment, a surprise for a friend, or a wine which fits the occasion, the season, the mood or the cuisine being served, I'm sure it will be a pleasant voyage of discovery - enjoy!

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