About Me


Gavin Hubble - (BSc & Post Grad. Business Marketing) - I started working in the wine industry over 23 years ago in New Zealand. Working in; wine retail, sales, wine production, label & packaging design, marketing, wine buying, consulting and wine education. I am responsible for the Brand Health of 60+ wine brands distributed here in New Zealand. Wine Brands from New Zealand, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Chile and Argentina. I work closely with the Trade Industry - (Retail Stores & Restaurants) introducing, educating and positioning exciting and unique brands to wine enthusiasts all over the world.

Monday, December 26, 2011

Henkell Trocken Dry Sec NV

Grape Variety: Cuvee of German & French grapes.

Growing Region: Rhine Valley, Germany


Director: Dr. Hans-Henning Wiegmann


Gold Medal - Vinalies Internationales, France 2011.

TASTING NOTE:
Founded back in 1856 - Henkell Trocken is not only Germany's favourite, but also their most exported sparkling wine, with more than 20 million bottles sold world-wide per year.
The taste is fresh, lively, with a subtle fragrant suggestion of tropical fruit on the nose. Its delicate pale straw colour is enlivened through the play of gold reflections around the edge. Henkell Trocken Dry Sec sparkling wine - sparkles with vivacious and long lasting effervescence. A fine bouquet of fruity notes, citrus characters make Henkell Trocken invitingly light and palatable. The taste is fresh, tingling, with a lingering finish, while a subtle fragrance entices you back for more.
This dry, fully matured sparkling wine owes its elegant character to a unique Cuvee of excellent wines originating from such classic grape varieties as French Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, and Blanc de Noir from French Pinot Noir and Chenin from Saumur. The finely blended, harmonious composition makes Henkell Trocken a well-balanced, consummate taste experience - and one to be shared. Serve at 7-8C.

CELLARING POTENTIAL:
Drinking perfectly well this coming summer season; or as an aperitif any time.

SUGGESTED FOOD MATCHES:
Perfect wine match with shellfish, seafood, fresh fruit and sorbet desserts, enjoy.

 

Monday, December 19, 2011

Jules Taylor Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc 2011

Grape Variety: 100% Sauvignon Blanc

Growing Region: Marlborough, New Zealand

Owner/ Chief Winemaker: Jules Taylor

Pure Gold - Air NZ Wine Awards 2011.

TASTING NOTE:
As soon as I began to pour the wine into my glass, I could sense summer thinking that it should get a wriggle on and turn up the heat. The 2011 Sauvignon harvest from Marlborough was not easy for many - but in this glass Jules has somehow captured some fantastic aromatics.
The fruit for this Sauvignon Blanc was grown in the Hawkesbury, Lower Wairau & Awatere Valley sub regions of Marlborough. If you have ever met Jules, she is one of the most approachable, relaxed people you will meet. But I would hate to be a Sauvignon grape waiting for the nod from Jules - as she is ruthless on quality and each parcel of fruit was chosen for its specific contribution to aroma, flavour and structure of the resultant blend. To retain as much natural freshness and varietal personality the winemaking was deliberately kept simple.
The grapes were harvested, pressed and cold settled over a period of 48 hours. After racking off juice lees, a long, cool fermentation with selected yeast strains took place. Post fermentation, the components were blended, stabilised and bottled. In the glass you will be greeted by a light lime colour. The wine has lively aromas of passion-fruit, citrus and capsicum notes. The palate is full of tropical and citrus fruits, nicely complemented by fresh herbaceous characters. The well balanced fruit and natural acidity ensures the flavours roll on to a lingering dry finish. Serve at 8C.

CELLARING POTENTIAL:
Drinking perfectly well this coming summer; and well into 2012.

SUGGESTED FOOD MATCHES:
Perfect wine match with shellfish, Asian & seafood cuisine and a feta cheese salad, enjoy.
 

 

Weekly Wine Picks:



Monday, December 12, 2011

Three Paddles Martinborough Sauvignon Blanc 2011

Grape Variety: 100% Sauvignon Blanc

Growing Region: Martinborough, New Zealand

Owner/Chief Winemaker: Roger Parkinson

TASTING NOTE:
Roger crafts his outstanding wines from vineyards that his family own or control. In this way he ensures that every decision having a bearing on the final wine is consistent with his focused objective of producing great Martinborough wine.
In the vineyard he prides himself on doing the little things well and it shows in each of his wines. I remember well Rogers first Sauvignon Blanc back in 1993 and have enjoyed his unique and subtle vinification techniques since - showcasing the 'terroir' from which this wine comes.
The carefully tended fruit came from the 'Home Block' vineyard just behind the winery; the grapes underwent cool fermentation in stainless steel tanks to retain the fruits aromatic notes and lively personality. In the glass you have a bright green/gold colour. The nose exhibits typical regional characteristics of ripe passion fruit and gooseberries. On the palate the wine is fresh and full-bodied and carries ripe tropical flavours through the palate to a crisp and persistent finish. Serve at 8-10C.

CELLARING POTENTIAL:
Drinking perfectly well this coming summer; and well into 2012.

SUGGESTED FOOD MATCHES:
Perfect wine match with shellfish, white fish, Asian cuisine and a fresh summer salad, enjoy.

A vibrant wine, with palate freshness.


 

Weekly Wine Picks:



Sunday, December 11, 2011

Winemaker Series:

Welcome to my summer series of winemaker interviews.


 

Dean Hewitson completed his wine making degree at Roseworthy College, South Australia, in 1986. After vintages in Western Australia and the Hunter Valley, Dean worked at one of Australia's most prestigious wineries in South Australia from 1987 to 1997. During this decade Dean completed numerous vintages overseas in Beaujolais, Provence, Bordeaux and Oregon. He also achieved his Master of Food Science in Enology at University of California, Davis, from 1990 to 1992. Dean founded Hewitson in 1998 with his wife Louise - and they now share it with their three children; Ned, Henry and Harriet.
Dean Hewitson must surely rank as one of the most talented winemakers of his generation. Dean sources fruit from up and down the rich terra-rossa Barossa Valley, notably from the Old Garden Mourvedre bush vine site planted back in 1853 and the Three Corner Grenache, Rawlands Flat vineyard dating back to 1890. He has made it his life's work to propagate the next generation of these fabulously old, living monuments by grafting their buds onto 30 year old rootstock.

I have had the pleasure to enjoy a glass of wine or two with Dean over the years - looking forward to sharing many more. Each time I open one of his wines in the glass you are treated to something special, as Dean has a rare ability to be able to capture the essence of history and the magic in old vines and bottle it. His passion for wine is undeniable and his desire to share this passion is even greater.

 
What first attracted you to the wine industry and as a winemaker?
Chance to combine inside and outside, art and science, tradition and progress.


Where and when did you study winemaking?
1984-1986 Roseworthy, South Australia
1990-1992 UC Davis, California

What is your favourite grape variety(s) to work with and why?
The Old Garden Mourvèdre (planted 1853) - humbling to work with grapes from a vineyard so old it is beyond human’s conventional thinking.

Which grape variety would you most like to work with in the future and why?
Some exotic white - haven’t found it yet!

 

With each new vintage what do you most look forward to?
The first grapes coming into the winery is always a time to celebrate.

To date what has been you most interesting/challenging vintage and why?
2011 - I had to make tough, hard decisions. No place for the faint-hearted.

Which person has influenced you the most as a winemaker and why?
Brian Croser - my boss for ten years. Guided me and gave me the opportunities to understand what makes great wine.

Which person ‘current’ or ‘past’ would you most like to have met or meet and why?
Assuming you mean in the wine industry it would have been really cool to have met Dom Perignon. It would have been so fascinating talking to him and watching him as he experimented with his techniques. Discussing the results would have been intriguing.

If you were stranded on a desert island and you could take one bottle of wine with you – what would it be and why?
A Sauternes - a mature Yquem. The flavours of the ripe tropical fruits I am eating would go wonderfully well with the wine.

If you could make wine anywhere else in the world – where would it be and why?
Right now I wouldn’t mind Spain. The wines and the place seem to have that rusticity and naturalness that I crave.

 

What advice would you give a young person starting out as a winemaker?
Travel and in particular go to your opposite World - work out why they make the wines they do.

If you weren’t a winemaker - what would you like to be and why?
Film Producer. I was accepted to do that before Wine Making but got scared at the last second.

In the future, what exciting changes can you see, or would like to see for your wines, wine styles, vineyard or winery?
Lots of things happening for us at the winery - we are well on our way to carbon neutrality for one. Also I can see an acceptance of Barossa Valley as the rightful home of Mourvèdre and blends thereof.

Hewitson Wines are available in New Zealand and around the world from quality wine retailers and restaurants. Or visit their website: Hewitson

Monday, December 5, 2011

Domaine Laroche Chablis 2010

Grape Variety: 100% Chardonnay

Growing Region: Chablis, France

Chief Winemaker: Denis de la Bourdonnaye

TASTING NOTE:
Both Michel Laroche owner and Denis the chief winemaker aim to work in tune with nature, encouraging low yields and use gentle viticulture to produce ripe fruit, typical of the vineyards origin. The gentlest possible methods are used in the winery to protect this natural personality. Each wine as with this one - are a pure expression of its specific vineyard area and of outstanding quality.
After gentle fermentation and 4 to 6 months on lees in stainless steel tank, this wine underwent 100% malolactic fermentation, and then had minimal filtration to preserve the maximum inherent character of the wine.
As part of their aim to retain purity and minerality in the finished wine, Laroche was the first Burgundian producer to move to screw-caps in 2002. So don't be surprised when you find that you only have to twist to enjoy this classic wine.
In the glass this Chablis shows a bright yellow colour. Precise fresh pears and apple fruit dominate the nose, with hints of mineral notes and white honey in behind. The palate is medium to full; with a complex mix of those pears, honey and citrus fruits, and excellent balancing acidity that gives the wine an elegant persistent finish. Serve at 8C.
 
CELLARING POTENTIAL:
Drinking perfectly well this coming summer; and will age nicely for another 4-5 years.
 
SUGGESTED FOOD MATCHES:
Perfect wine match with oysters, shellfish, any firm white fish and a fresh green salad, enjoy.

Guaranteed to bring a smile to your taste-buds.

 

Weekly Wine Picks:

Monday, November 28, 2011

Isabel Estate 'Marlborough' Chardonnay 2007

Grape Variety: 100% Chardonnay

Growing Region: Wairau Valley, New Zealand

Head Winemaker: Patricia Miranda

TASTING NOTE:
It is always interesting to taste a wine made from different clones of Chardonnay and due to the unique cool climate location of the vineyards - this wine is made from 6 sometimes 7 clones. To craft such a complex wine the fruit from selected sites and rows was hand-picked and then gently whole bunch pressed. A portion was placed into stainless steel tanks for fermentation and then transferred into French oak barrels.
The other portion was fermented in second and third year old French oak barrels using different strains of yeast. Both were lee stirred regularly while ageing for over 12 months. Twenty percent of the barrels underwent Malolactic fermentation while being closely monitored. Each parcel was fermented in separate batches in an effort to highlight flavour diversity of clonal character and thereby enhance complexity.
In the glass you are greeted by a fairly pronounced yellow colour, the nose has developed considerably, but still showing a bright nutty bouquet. The palate has a concentration of fresh fruit, integrated toasty oak with firm, balanced acidity. The wine has layers of citrus and green apples, subtle floral notes as well as honey rounding out the palate complexity and adding to a lingering finish. Serve at 8-10C.

CELLARING POTENTIAL:
Drinking perfectly well this coming summer; and over the coming 12-18 months.

SUGGESTED FOOD MATCHES:
Perfect wine match with bbq pork, creamy chicken cuisine and mature brie, enjoy.

Layers of flavour and personality.

   

Wines in Brief:

 
 

Sunday, November 27, 2011

Winemaker Series:

Welcome to the second in my summer series of winemaker interviews.


 

Tony Bish - his sense of self-mastery for winemaking ignited in 1981 while working in Gisborne alongside Doug Wilson, Corban's winemaker at the time. Tony embarked on a six year correspondence degree in Oenology at Charles Sturt University in Australia, while continuing to work full time in the wine industry.
Tony began working at Sacred Hill at the beginning, in 1985, and the first vintage, 1986, was just 350 cases, which included the launch of Sacred Hill's first wine - a Fume Blanc. The wine sold out almost immediately, confirming the viability of the Sacred Hill venture.
After the launch, Tony moved on to hone his skills at a number of acclaimed wineries, including Brown Brothers in Australia, Rippon Vineyards in Central Otago and Martinborough Vineyards in the Wairarapa. He returned to work with the Mason family in 1994, and his nose for detail has seen Sacred Hill wines accelerate to the front of the New Zealand & International wine scene. Tony has now amassed more than 100 Trophies, gold medals and 5 Stars - an achievement that makes him one of New Zealand's top winemakers.


I have had the pleasure to know Tony since 1994, when I was visiting my family in Hawke’s Bay, knowing the Mason brothers (the owners of Scared Hill) for several years - I made my way over the hill from Taradale to visit the winery and the infamous cliffs that set the scene for a dramatic vineyard location, plus for a select few - one of the world’s best places to practice clay-bird shooting. Over the years it has been a unique opportunity to see at such close quarters a winemaker and his vines develop and grow together, while at the same time crafting wines that excite and stretch the palates of local wine enthusiasts and international wine aficionados. Tony has truly mastered his own domain i.e. unique terroir and different grape varieties and shaped internationally respected wines.

What first attracted you to the wine industry and as a winemaker?
“First attraction as seasonal work over vintage. 84 hours a week was a great way to fund my winters skiing! After two or three vintages, I got the wine bug bad, and realised the industry had significant potential to make premium and super premium wines”.

Where and when did you study winemaking?
“I enrolled in Wine Science by correspondence at Charles Sturt University in Australia, and spent 6 years commuting twice a year to residential schools. This was 1984-1989”.

What is your favourite grape variety(s) to work with and why?
“Chardonnay - I love its complexity and the way it expresses great terroir. Power, elegance and finesse, a wine that can be so completely satisfying.

Syrah - It such an exciting variety here in Hawke’s Bay! Fun to work with as we are on a steep learning curve while producing better and better wine each year. It’s very dynamic. The wines from Gimblett gravels are so amazing, richly flavoured and smooth textured, ultimately drinkable!

Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot blends - Here in Gimblett gravels we are making world class blended red wines that are rocking the world. I love the complexity of the blending process, and getting Cabernet ripe and balanced is very rewarding”.

 

Which grape variety would you most like to work with in the future and why?
“Petite Verdot would be a great additional variety to work with our Gimblett gravels red blends. We love Cabernet Franc, and its small but crucial role in great blends, but I would love to add Petite Verdot to the blending table”.

With each new vintage what do you most look forward to?
“The vineyard walks, the critical picking decisions, the buzz when you know you have just picked some really good fruit. The influx of new and keen vintage staff is awesome too. The sense of teamwork and camaraderie is great”.

To date what has been you most interesting/challenging vintage and why?
“The last vintage (the last one is always the most interesting and challenging!). Vintage 2011 was such a vintage of extremes. Brilliant in Marlborough for us, we have already won many Gold medals, but super challenging in Hawke’s Bay, where untimely rain destroyed all our best Chardonnay. But we were able to rock on, and have made some outstanding red blends from later ripening fruit”.

Which person has influenced you the most as a winemaker and why?
“To be frank, no one single person, but many. Mike Grgich, ‘The King of Chardonnay’ in Napa Valley was a positive influence. He was interviewed in his 70’s and asked a question about his winemaking philosophy. He said then that he was just getting the hang of it! Humble, determined, and constantly pursuing quality. Paul Pontallier of Chateau Margaux. I heard him speak about making great red wines many years ago at a Cool Climate Winemaking Symposium. Very articulate, and very clear about what attributes great red wine should possess. Inspirational, as are his wines”.

Which person ‘current’ or ‘past’ would you most like to have met or meet and why?
“I would like to meet and taste wines with Peter Gago of Penfolds Australia. His work with Yattarna and Bin 08A along with his legendary reds, he would be fascinating to talk to and learn from”.

If you were stranded on a desert island and you could take one bottle of wine with you – what would it be and why?
“Well, it would be hot and dry and kind of beautiful. So providing I had ice and a Riedel flute….a Methuselah of 1990 Cristal Brut Millenum cuvée”!
  
If you could make wine anywhere else in the world – where would it be and why?
“Burgundy, Bonneau du Martray, Corton Charlemagne. Awesome as Chardonnay (& Pinot!)”.

What advice would you give a young person starting out as a winemaker?
“Educate, travel, and find what inspires you”.

 

If you weren’t a winemaker – what would you like to be and why?
“Tough one. Wine buyer for the rich and famous, advising on what to load the cellars with, travelling and tasting the wines from the great regions of the world (by private jet naturally). Well you did ask!”

In the future, what exciting changes can you see, or would like to see for your wines, wine styles, vineyard or winery?
“Syrah will become a NZ rock star. It’s happening, and the next ten years will be exciting. Chardonnay will make a comeback if there is any right in this world. Marlborough Sauvignon is still the best in the world, so when global market recovery happens and supply tension returns, better times will return for our most important commercial variety. Sacred Hill will be more and more globally recognised as a premium producer of NZ wines, whilst remaining an awesome place to work!”

Sacred Hill Wines are available in New Zealand and around the world from quality wine retailers and restaurants. Or visit their website: Sacred Hill Wines.

Monday, November 21, 2011

Fallen Angel 'Marlborough' Riesling 2011

Grape Variety: 100% Riesling

Growing Region: Marlborough, New Zealand

Chief Winemaker: Steve White

TASTING NOTE:
As the longer and warmer days start to stretch across this fare land, I'm sure many of you like myself are thinking about enjoying shellfish and prawns on the bbq, summer salads and alike and what better match than a fresh, citrus driven glass of Riesling.
The fruit for this wine came from two vineyard blocks owned by the Wiffen family in the Omaka sub-region of Marlborough's Wairau Valley. Each individual parcel of fruit was separately crushed and pressed early morning in Marlborough, with the chilled juice then being transported to the winery to complete its transformation. The first parcel added incredible citrus lime and lemon characters. This made the palate focused and concentrated, and a pure minerality was revealed. The next two parcels were broad in their palate weight, with extremely rich tropical aromatics.
100% fermented in stainless steel, using three different yeast strains and a range of ferment temperatures, to retain varietal expression. The components were then blended together, producing a wine that expresses vibrant citrus characters and a ripe stone fruit balance between fruit sugar and acid minerality. On the nose a beautifully focused wine that exhibits intense citrus fruit characters of lemons and limes, overlaid with riper tropical hints of mango and pineapple. The palate is balanced perfectly with the sweetness/acid symmetry, with the richness and fruit weight in harmony with the mineral backbone, giving a persistent fresh finish. Serve at 8C.

CELLARING POTENTIAL:
Drinking perfectly well this coming summer; and right through 2012.

SUGGESTED FOOD MATCHES:
Perfect wine match with shellfish, prawns, sushi, crisp salads and more, enjoy.

Packed with citrus flavours and freshness.

 

Wines in Brief:

 

Saturday, November 19, 2011

Winemaker Series:

Welcome to the first in my summer series of winemaker interviews.

 

Caroline Frey - former equestrian champion and an accomplished pianist also topped her Class of 2003 in oenology at the University of Bordeaux. Caroline’s family own Chateau La Lagune in the Haut Medoc, along with Maison Jaboulet in the Rhone Valley, and has a substantial but not majority shareholding in Champagne Billecart-Salmon in Mareuil-sur-Aÿ.
Chateau La Lagune is the first Cru Classe one encounters as you drive along the Route du Medoc. The Frey family has owned the property since 2000, and is determined to produce a wine of the highest order worthy of this honour. Classified as a Third Growth Haut-Medoc in the 1855 Classification, La Lagune is in the village of Ludon before Le Pian.
Caroline Frey has been the winemaker at Ch. La Lagune since 2004, in the same year she asked her former professor, Denis Dubourdieu, to join as a consultant.
In 2006, the family bought a prestigious yet slightly tired domain, Paul Jaboulet Ainé in the Rhone Valley. There, Caroline discovered the power of some of the rarest terroirs of the Northern Rhone.

I have had the pleasure to meet with Caroline Frey in both Bordeaux at Chateau La Lagune in the Haut Medoc and at Maison Jaboulet in the Rhone Valley. So thought what better way to start this series than by talking with a winemaker who works with two such unique, removed terroirs and different grape varieties and find out what shapes the winemaker, who shapes these influential wines.

What first attracted you to the wine industry and as a winemaker?
“I grew up amongst some of the world’s most beautiful vineyards in Champagne, where my father purchased his first vineyards when I was very young. We spent a lot of time together in the vineyards and in the cellars. I always had many questions and he would take the time to explain details about the vineyards and winemaking to me. Growing up I was very interested in wine but not yet ready to become a winemaker as I was consumed by another passion - horse-riding and show-jumping in equestrian competitions! It was only when I turned 20-years-old that I decided to study oenology.”

Where and when did you study winemaking?
“I studied at the Bordeaux Enology University (2002-2003). There I had the chance to meet my mentor Denis Dubourdieu and I did several training periods in his winery”.

What is your favourite grape variety(s) to work with and why?
“I love all the grape varieties, especially the ones I use in both our properties at La Lagune and Paul Jaboulet Ainé: Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Petite Verdot, Syrah, Grenache, Mourvèdre, Marsanne, Roussanne and Viognier!”

 

Which grape variety would you most like to work with in the future and why?
“I would like to have a parcel of Petit Arvine! This is a little known Swiss grape varietal.”

With each new vintage what do you most look forward to?
“The challenge is always to produce better and better wines. I am always trying to improve.”

Which person has influenced you the most as a winemaker and why?
“Denis Dubourdieu. He is my mentor! He has taught me the value of continuously trying to do better.”

Which person ‘current’ or ‘past’ would you most like to have met or meet and why?
“I would like to meet Georges Brunet; he really saved La Lagune in the 60’s and Gerard Jaboulet who poured his life into the winery. Without them La Lagune and Jaboulet would probably not be here today.”

If you were stranded on a desert island and you could take one bottle of wine with you – what would it be and why? It would
“It would have to be wine which is beautiful and also one which holds sentimental value for me. And there is only one wine I would consider. It is our exclusive blend, one barrel only(!), called ‘DUO’  - 50% La Lagune and 50% La Chapelle. Tres Belle!”

If you could make wine anywhere else in the world – where would it be and why?
“It would be in Switzerland, in the Valais. It is the North of the Rhone Valley!”

What advice would you give a young person starting out as a winemaker?
“First condition to succeed: Being Passionate!”

 

If you weren’t a winemaker - what would you like to be and why?
“Winemaker!”

In the future, what exciting changes can you see, or would like to see for your wines, wine styles, vineyard or winery?
“My vision for our wineries is to have fully biodynamic viticulture - that will be my challenge in the next few years!”


Both Chateau La Lagune and Maison Jaboulet are available in New Zealand from quality wine retailers. Or visit their websites: Chateau La Lagune  -  Maison Paul Jaboulet

Monday, November 14, 2011

Rimu Grove 'Nelson' Pinot Gris 2010

Grape Variety: 100% Pinot Gris

Growing Region: Moutere, Nelson, New Zealand

Owner/ Winemaker: Patrick Stowe

TASTING NOTE:
I already know one of my New Year's resolutions for next year, drink more wine from Nelson. If I forget, what hope do most of our wine enthusiasts have that don't live in this part of the wine world. Nelson has a great deal to offer with New Zealand's diverse cuisine and this wine displays that fact with charm and character.
The fruit for this wine was sourced from their Moutere Hills vineyard, the carefully harvested ripe fruit underwent 100% whole-cluster pressing. The resultant intense juice - 15% was aged on lies in seasoned French oak barrels for 6 months, the remaining 85% matured on its lies in stainless steel tanks, to retain the vibrant personality of this variety.
In the glass you are greeted by a light golden colour. Escaping from the glass you have aromas of citrus blossom, pear, tropical fruits and spice notes. The intense nose nearly prepares you for the opulence of the palate, which is rich in texture, with a thick and rich mouth-feel, Manuka honey fills the mid-palate and the wine finishes off with lingering notes of quince spice and Moutere mineral characters. Serving Temperature: 9-11C.

CELLARING POTENTIAL:
Drinking perfectly well this coming summer; and will age for another 2-3 years.

SUGGESTED FOOD MATCHES:
Perfect wine match with Asian cuisine, subtle spices and vegetarian dishes, enjoy.

Layers of flavour that will surprise and delight.

     

Wines in Brief:

Monday, November 7, 2011

Taylors 'Jaraman' Riesling 2009

Grape Variety: 100% Riesling

Growing Region: 59% Clare Valley & 41% Eden Valley, South Australia


Chief Winemaker: Adam Eggins


Gold Medal - Decanter World Wine Awards 2010.

TASTING NOTE:
A lively collaboration of two unique wine regions of South Australia. After harvesting the fruit in the evening, the winemaking team gave this wine as with all the fruit at Taylors immense care to ensure varietal and regional flavours formed in the vineyard were carried through to the bottle. The free run juice was racked and a relatively neutral yeast strain added to initiate the fermentation that was carried out in stainless steel tanks at cool temperatures, then minimal fining and filtration prior to bottling.
In the glass a bright wine with a slight lime hue. On the nose, expressive floral aromas along with lime, lemon and a slight mineral note. The Clare Valley component delivers ample ripe citrus flavours with tight acidity while the Eden Valley parcel adds a touch of mineral complexity. This crafted wine shows flavours of fresh lemon, kaffir lime leaf, a firm mid-palate with cleansing acidity. The wine has an underlying mineral character which adds to the elegant finish of the wine. Serve at approx 8-9C.

CELLARING POTENTIAL:
Drinking perfectly well this coming summer; and will age for 5-6 years.

SUGGESTED FOOD MATCHES:
Perfect wine match with chilly prawns, Asian seafood, Greek salad, enjoy.